The glory of cooking with autumn leaves – part 2

I was so excited by last night's autumn leaf broth that I needed to taste more - thank goodness I'd not used all the leaves in the first experiment! Even better, just a few pages on in the same book was another recipe with leaves at its heart: 'Vegetables cooked with autumn leaves' (p 194).… Continue reading The glory of cooking with autumn leaves – part 2

The glory of cooking with autumn leaves – part 1

I'm still working through the Fäviken cookbook, and armed with the weekend's forage of autumn leaves in various stages of maturity tonight seemed like a good moment to try the 'Broth of autumn leaves' (p190). I wasn't convinced that I had exactly the right moss (or the perfect leaves), but I was confident that they were… Continue reading The glory of cooking with autumn leaves – part 1

Cured egg yolk – day 3

I love that fact that these yolks are so forgiving of my daily interference. Most things I've ever decided to steep, cure or macerate have needed to go into a permanently sealed container and rest in the darkness of a cool cupboard, quiet and undisturbed, until I've almost forgotten about them. It is so much… Continue reading Cured egg yolk – day 3

Cured egg yolk – day 2

Yesterday I started curing some egg yolks, in preparation for a recipe in Magnus Nilsson's Fäviken cookbook. I can't resist checking them to see how they are progressing, and today there is already a change! The yolks are visibly firmer, more intensely orange, and starting to hold a more solid shape. I ruffle up the dampened… Continue reading Cured egg yolk – day 2

Capering around with nasturtium seeds

Nasturtiums are one of those fantastic plants that combine ease of growth with good looks. Their big tough seeds always come up and the plants seem to survive whatever you or the weather might throw at them. I plant trailing nasturtium seeds around the edges of the pots on my small London terrace every year,… Continue reading Capering around with nasturtium seeds

Damson Chutney

Damsons are the most delicious plum to cook with. Sharp and deeply flavoured, in my opinion they make the very best chutney you can eat, and the strongest flavoured plum jam. I was overjoyed to find them in my local Borough Market a few years ago – but not so overjoyed by the exorbitant price.… Continue reading Damson Chutney

Fresh jam – plum, peach, raspberry and rosemary

I don’t know why I never used to think of making jam in small quantities. It’s such obvious instant gratification! You can make something delicious and seasonal just a jar at a time, eat it up in a week or two, and then make some more. It’s faster and more efficient to cook, and since… Continue reading Fresh jam – plum, peach, raspberry and rosemary

Apricot chutney with a touch of wild cherry

Almost all the chutney I make ends up looking a dark brownish black, mainly because it is made with dark fruit and/or dark brown sugar. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it does mean that even though the different versions might taste different, they do all tend to look the same.  This time, I was… Continue reading Apricot chutney with a touch of wild cherry

Fresh apricot jam

A good ripe apricot is one of the joys of summer, but a woolly one is one of its cruellest disappointments. Living in central London means I am at the mercy of the fruit-sellers, and at best I only have a 50/50 chance of getting a good one. So, whenever I find myself in a… Continue reading Fresh apricot jam